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20121101
20121130
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KQED (PBS) 18
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English 18
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
in america and around the globe. across egypt today there have been violent protests following the president's decision to grant himself sweeping new powers. buildings belonging to the muslim brotherhood party have been ransacked, with some set on fire. the president says he has taken on the powers to help steer the country through the difficult transition to democracy, but critics claim he is trying to make himself a new pharaoh. >> fury in egypt as president morsi gives himself a big, new powers. there were protests across the country. in cairo, the crowds flooded back to tahrir square, where last year they celebrated the ousting of hosni mubarak. now they say the new president has become even more of the dictator with an edict saying the courts cannot challenge him. >> he is taking more power than mubarak. >> it was only days ago that the president was basking in the world and american approval as he helped mediate the gaza ceasefire. now washington has expressed its concern about the president's latest edict. the president came out to tell his supporters that he was only acting to defend
and of the opposition. >> brown: then, we update the growing unrest in egypt where the islamist-dominated assembly fast-tracked a vote on a new constitution. >> suarez: we continue our conversations with newly-elected senators. tonight, arizona republican, jeff flake. >> >> we're at a point on the fiscal issues where we have to reach an agreement and perhaps as we do so that will start the stage for the other areas as well. >> brown: fred de sam lazaro has the story of a minnesota non- profit that celebrates diversity and the power of dance. >> they're one of the few companies that within their own work spans so many kinds of different style, from classical ballet to modern dance to contemporary performance to urban dance. >> suarez: and we look at college sports teams, moving from conference to conference, playing a game of musical chairs where the end goal is more money from lucrative tv contracts. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connect
of the replenishing of arms going into gaza. i think there is probably from the hamas side with egypt as egypt is probably promising the opening of passages which up until now at the descriptions have not really opened. and there may be something to do with what the israelis will be allowing into gaza, the fact is the israelis allowed much more into gaza, they still want to be able to check ships to be sure that big weapons aren't coming in that way but i think that is probably the outline that hamas probably also wants commitments from the israelis about not going after their leadership. >> elliott, do you think this is a deal that the israelis will believe in and think acceptable for them? >> i do. i think one really critical part of it is the egyptian side, that is policing that border, something that the number rec regime did not do. the egyptians will promise to do that and the question then is, will the new government do it? and keep at least the long range iranian rockets from entering gaza? will they really police it and really close the tunnels i think that is going to be quite criti
war and with elections they decided enough for now. >> this is a critical moment for the region. egypt posing new government is assuming the responsibility and leadership that has long made this country's " -- a cornerstone of regional stability and peace. >> the site of weapons supplied by the u.s. bombing arabs once again means that too much american craze is something that no leader in the american -- and no leader in the arab east wants right now. this morning as negotiations reached a critical stage, they were burying the night's dead. egypt is struggling to recreate itself. >> there has been a lot of cross border violence. there is no reason to oppose a new one either. not unless there is a change. >> @ gaudette's main hospital there was no -- more support from the east. libyans in turkey helping hamas believe that history is on its side. >> eight days have helped the hands of the zionist to submit to history. >> many more palestinians and israelis have been killed and wounded. death and injuries feel the same on either side. making a cease-fire in a conflict this bitter, which h
in tahrir square-- familiar scenes in egypt nearly two years ago that led to the fall of longtime leader hosni mubark. but today, they were aimed at egypt's new leader. in the coastal city of alexandria, opponents set fire to the offices of president mohammed morsi's political party, the muslim brotherhood. there and elsewhere in egypt today, the president's critics and supporters clashed in the streets over his decree yesterday exempting himself from judicial review, and giving him authority to take steps against "threats to the revolution." morsi, egypt's first freely elected president, took office in june. in recent days, he'd garnered worldwide praise for mediating a cease-fire between israel and hamas. today, he told a supportive crowd outside the presidential palace in cairo that granting himself sweeping powers was necessary to prevent figures from the old regime from halting progress. >> ( translated ): i haven't taken a decision to use it against anyone-- to go against anyone is something that i could never be associated with-- or announcing that i am biased towards anyone. howe
. egypt's president is a leader of the muslim brotherhood. the assassination will be seen as a calculated and dangerous insult. egypt strongly condemns what israel is doing in gaza. this is an unacceptable act, and we deeply condemn it. >> what has changed since the war? the west and israel have lost their most reliable friend, and egypt's president mubarak. they saw him as an indispensable part of the solution at times like this. >> heightened tensions in the middle east tonight. in other news from around the world, the united nations secretary general ban ki moon has set a report on the failure to attack civilians. -- has said a report on the failure to attack civilians will have a profound impact. in iraq, simultaneous car bomb attacks across the country have killed at least 17 people. dozens were injured. the attack struck baghdad and other cities. it is not clear if the attacks are the work of one group. across europe, tens of thousands have taken to the streets in protest of rising unemployment and government austerity measures. workers in spain, portugal, greece, and italy went out
between the two sides were put off for now. egypt's foreign minister, mohammed kamel amr, announced the breakthrough with secretary of state hillary clinton at his side. >> egypt has exerted efforts and conducted intensive discussions since the renewed outbreak of hostilities in the gaza strip with all parties: the palestinian leadership, the these efforts and communications managed to reach an agreement to a ceasefire and the return of calm and halt of the violence and the bloodshed that was witnessed recently. >> the united states welcomes the agreement today for a ceasefire in gaza. for it to hold, the rocket attacks must end, a broader calm returned. in the days ahead, the united states will work with partners across region to consolidate this progess, improve conditions for the people of gaza, provide security for the people of israel. >> woodruff: a short time later this afternoon, israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu told reporters he leaves open the possibility of a ground invasion of gaza at a later date, but agreeing to a ceasefire made sense now. >> i know there are
, beginning with the political crisis in egypt. >> suarez: then, in her final report from turkey, margaret warner looks at the growing clout of syria's kurdish minority, and the impact that's having on the other side of the border. >> brown: when does a co-worker count as a supervisor? that question was before the supreme court today in a case about harassment. marcia coyle explains. >> suarez: and we examine new figures from the pew research center showing that young voters played a decisive role reelecting president obama. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: a still tentati
. around our house, all are civilians. no one is firing. >> egypt has denied reports to be arranged a truce. >> for more on the high stakes of this escalating violence, i folk with former senator george mitchell. -- i spoke with former senator george mitchell. thank you very much for joining me. neither side appears to be backing down. this is not going to be over in a few days. just how serious is this? could we be seeing the start of the war? >> it is a very serious issue. i've been saying for some time, nearly a year, there was a will that had created a false sense of security on all sides. the real danger is not so much from the internal conflict within gaza, it is given the highly unstable and volatile situation in the region, this could be a spark that lights a conflict that extent in other unpredictable ways. it is a very serious matter. >> are you seeing any signs of that happening imminently? >> there is a long pattern in history. neither side appears to be backing down. that is in the case in the past. in the past, they have found in their mutual interest to establish a cease-fire
to give thanks to president morsi of egypt." across gaza, he's something of a new hero, and they're even impressed in israel. the egyptian president right now the best hope for peacekeeping here. >> egypt was able to regain it's regional role as a regional player, mediating between the israelis and the palestinians in convincing both of them to reach a ceasefire agreement. in the city, the flags, the rallies, talking up victory. in the countryside, the hamas song is, we're going to bomb tel aviv. but away from politics, what about people, lives disrupted by all this? yesterday we filmed awad and his mum sabbah taking shelter in a school in gaza city. frightened, disorientated, a severely disabled boy caught up in all this. today, diplomacy had delivered. sabbah was at home with the family in atatrah. >> it's good that we're okay. i'm very happy i can't believe it, i'm shivering. that face, sabbah said, means he's feeling happy and safe, and with an arm's round from brother mahmoud, and no sound of an explosion. >> sreenivasan: in israel, reserve troops began moving away from the border w
to negotiate with the muslim brotherhood new president of egypt who doesn't even know where all the rooms are in the presidential palace, you have to deal with a raging civil war in syria and an israeli government that, you know, no one knows basically who is the majority anymore let alone xab what it stands for. so this is not a great time to be secretary of state. i've said if you want to do national security in this country ask to be secretary of education. >> rose: thank you for joining us. see you tomorrow night captioning sponsored by rose communications captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org
. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> i'm kathy kay. egypt is young and fragile,
is higher in the united states than it is in egypt. that's quite a journey from where we were when i was growing up. >> right now i think it's where we're seeing the kind of better fruit of winner-take-all politics because the financial crisis was not an act of god or work of nature. it was brought on by poor decisions that were made in washington and on wall street. yes, there's a global dimension of this but a big part of it was failures of domestic policy. if you look to our northern neighbor, canada, it had nothing like the same definition banking crisis as the united states did and that's partly because it had much more effective regulations of the financial sector. you know over this period that we saw leverage and speculation increasing on wall street, washington, both democrats and republicans, were trying as hard as they could to allow wall street to do even more. >> so winner-take-all politics has produced a winner-take-all economy, right? >> yes. >> yes. >> and the winners are? >> the winners are those who've made out so well in this new economy. the very well off and fina
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)

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